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Jupiter Retrograde Hits Oscars

by Garry Wiseman, astrologer (and Barry’s former teacher!)

 Jupiter retrograding, in its early stages, can scramble things just as much as Mercury going “backwards”. We had to wait a little while for the best global example. Then, two weeks after the retrograde began, a special trigger brought us a doozy. Just hours after the Solar Eclipse in Pisces (sign of the movies), we saw that good old-fashioned stuff-up at The Oscars.

Lots of Piscean confusion reigned on stage, and the look on the face of one front-row audience member was priceless. Yes, none other than Meryl Streep! She looked as nonplussed as she must have been when given the “wrong envelope” of that quote. Usually you’d expect Mercury to be up to its tricky ears in such a stuff-up, but the Oscar DOESN’T go to Mercury in this case. Clear the stage please, Winged Messenger, because on this occasion, your big brother Jupiter gets the little gold icon.  

NB from BE… It was later revealed that the person handing the envelope to the presenters was in the wings taking ‘selfies’ with the stars before they went on stage. More Piscean confusion and delusion!!

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At last an astronomer who takes an open minded approach…

 Royal astronomer: ‘Aliens may be staring us in the face’

Aliens may be “staring us in the face” in a form humans are unable to recognise, the Queen’s astronomer has said.

Aliens may be 'staring us in the face' according to Lord Martin Rees, the president of the Royal Society

Aliens may be ‘staring us in the face’ according to Lord Martin Rees, the president of the Royal Society

He made the remarks shortly after hosting the national science academy’s first conference on the possibility of alien life.

“They could be staring us in the face and we just don’t recognise them. The problem is that we’re looking for something very much like us, assuming that they at least have something like the same mathematics and technology,” he said.

“I suspect there could be life and intelligence out there in forms we can’t conceive. Just as a chimpanzee can’t understand quantum theory, it could be there as aspects of reality that are beyond the capacity of our brains.”

Lord Rees used the conference in January, entitled The Detection of Extra-terrestrial Life and the Consequences for Science and Society, to ask whether the discovery of aliens would cause terror or delight on earth. He told Prospect magazine that improved telescopes made the chance of finding extra-terrestrial life “better than ever”.

But Dr Frank Drake, the world’s leading “ET hunter”, told the conference that satellite TV and the “digital revolution” was making humanity invisible to aliens by cutting the transmission of TV and radio signals into space.

At present, the Earth is surrounded by a 50 light year-wide “shell” of radiation from analogue TV, radio and radar transmissions. But although the signals have spread far enough to reach many nearby star systems, they are rapidly vanishing in the wake of digital technology, according to Dr Drake.

The scientist, who founded the Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence organisation in the United States, said digital TV signals would look like noise to a race of observing aliens.

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Ask An Astrologer About the Importance of Ceres In Your Chart

IT’S an invader. Shiny spots and minerals on the surface of Ceres suggest that the asteroid belt’s largest object may have been born in the outer solar system, far from its current abode. This also hints that our current classification of comets, asteroids and planets is too simplistic.

At 950 kilometres across, Ceres is considered a dwarf planet like Pluto, despite orbiting in the main asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. When NASA’s Dawn spacecraft arrived at Ceres in March, it saw that most of the dwarf is as dark as fresh asphalt, but that there are lighter spots in craters, which range from the brightness of concrete to that of ocean ice.

New measurements suggest that the bright regions are mostly made of icy salt deposits, says Andreas Nathues, lead investigator for Dawn’s camera team at the Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research in Munich, Germany.

A large crater called Occator has an especially bright pit, which probably contains water ice that vaporises as Ceres rotates into sunlight. The vapour produces haze clouds that appear and disappear during Ceres’s 9-hour day.

That makes Ceres the first large body in the asteroid belt to show such comet-like activity, blurring the line between comet and asteroid.

The Dawn team thinks the ice originated beyond the solar system’s “snow line”, where water molecules condense. In the early solar system, this would have been several hundred million kilometres farther from the sun than Ceres’s current location, suggesting that the dwarf planet was born in the land of comets and migrated inwards later (Nature, 10.1038/nature15754).

Other observations support this idea, says Maria Cristina De Sanctis of the Italian National Institute of Astrophysics in Rome. Using Dawn’s spectrometer, she and her colleagues detected that minerals called ammoniated phyllosilicates make up about 10 per cent of Ceres’s surface. For these minerals to form, ammonia had to be incorporated as the dwarf planet formed – and ammonia ice is also only stable at the temperatures beyond the snow line (Nature, 10.1038/nature16172).

Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune probably moved a lot in the solar system’s early days, which could have sent objects like Ceres hurtling closer to the sun, says Chris Russell, Dawn’s principal investigator.

“Ceres is right at that transition zone, where we’re moving from predominantly rocky bodies to outer solar system objects that are predominantly water ice,” says Shane Byrne at the University of Arizona in Tucson. Its mix of comet-like and planet-like characteristics adds a new dimension to the debate about how to define a planet.

 

By Rebecca Boyle

(Source:  activistpost.com; December 9, 2015; http://tinyurl.com/ouc3ja3)

 

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